Manually Adding Vista or Windows 7 to OSS
Contents

Introduction

Sample Vista Entry

Making the Changes

Additional Important Information

Introduction

OSS (build 2,160) does not properly detect many Vista installations, especially name-brand OEM versions or "tweaked" standard Vista installations. Windows 7 is also not detected automatically. In order to boot into these undetected operating systems, they must be manually added to the OSS menu.

Because the procedure for adding Windows 7 is exactly the same as adding Vista, "Vista" will be used throughout the guide. The main exception is the name you give to your Windows 7 entry (you won't call it Vista).

For the purpose of this guide, the following assumptions have been made:

NOTICE: By using this guide, you assume full responsibility for any damages or problems that may occur. Prior to making any changes, it's strongly recommended that you create a backup copy of the BOOTWIZ.OSS file and create a backup image of the drive.
Sample Vista Entry

When adding the Vista entry, you can copy an existing Vista entry and modify it or you can use the sample Vista Manual entry.

Here is an existing Vista entry as added by OSS into the <oses> section of the file:

<id3056036235 boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="1709083925" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="%n%l %l(%ll%l)" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" system_root_identifier="0000000000000000000000000000000006000000000000004800000000000000007e000000000000000000000000000000000000010000004cf9307400000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000\Windows" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="1">
    <partitions>
        <id1709083925 active="1" />
    </partitions>
</id3056036235>

Here is a Vista entry that's been converted (except for ID values):

<id########## boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="##########" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="Vista Manual" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="0">
    <partitions>
        <id########## active="1" />
    </partitions>
</id##########>

The following changes have been made:

A text file of this converted sample can be downloaded below:

Download
Sample Vista Manual OSS Entry -- Right-click on the link and select Save Target As... from the pop-up menu to save a copy to your computer.
Making the Changes

The next step is to add the manual entry into the BOOTWIZ.OSS file.

It's strongly recommended to use the Windows Notepad program when editing the BOOTWIZ.OSS file. Using a different text editor can cause undesired results.

To help make understanding the process easier, I will be using the same sample BOOTWIZ.OSS file as the one used in the Understanding the BOOTWIZ.OSS File guide.

Here is the original "before" version of the file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<bootwiz>
    <disks>
        <id633667013 bios_num="128" crc="120032723" real_bios_num="128" serial="35325" size="134215679" />
        <id3440059480 bios_num="129" crc="136308743" real_bios_num="129" serial="1109" size="136312799" />
    </disks>
    <cds />
    <partitions>
        <id1709083925 begin="63" crc="36865" disk="633667013" fs="ntfs" number="1" serial="2b645f8c7e5f8c8a" size="67210720" type="7" />
        <id2137937787 begin="67211264" crc="22225" disk="633667013" fs="fat32" number="2" serial="413e7c40" size="204800" type="12" />
        <id2457113254 begin="67416064" crc="36865" disk="633667013" fs="ntfs" number="3" serial="773e9a5c879a5cfa" size="52428800" type="7" />
        <id286857235 begin="2048" crc="36865" disk="3440059480" fs="ntfs" number="1" serial="3fca2cb8f92cb8e6" size="136306688" type="7" />
    </partitions>
    <oses>
        <id3056036235 boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="1709083925" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="%n%l %l(%ll%l)" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" system_root_identifier="0000000000000000000000000000000006000000000000004800000000000000007e000000000000000000000000000000000000010000004cf9307400000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000\Windows" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="1">
            <partitions>
                <id1709083925 active="1" />
            </partitions>
        </id3056036235>
    </oses>
    <checkfiles />
    <bootmgr default_os="3056036235" disks_order_feature="1" />
</bootwiz>

The first step is to copy and paste the new manual entry into the file. I usually copy an existing "manual" entry (as above) and then just update the rest. However, it's also easy to copy an existing working entry. In this example, the results are the same:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<bootwiz>
    <disks>
        <id633667013 bios_num="128" crc="120032723" real_bios_num="128" serial="35325" size="134215679" />
        <id3440059480 bios_num="129" crc="136308743" real_bios_num="129" serial="1109" size="136312799" />
    </disks>
    <cds />
    <partitions>
        <id1709083925 begin="63" crc="36865" disk="633667013" fs="ntfs" number="1" serial="2b645f8c7e5f8c8a" size="67210720" type="7" />
        <id2137937787 begin="67211264" crc="22225" disk="633667013" fs="fat32" number="2" serial="413e7c40" size="204800" type="12" />
        <id2457113254 begin="67416064" crc="36865" disk="633667013" fs="ntfs" number="3" serial="773e9a5c879a5cfa" size="52428800" type="7" />
        <id286857235 begin="2048" crc="36865" disk="3440059480" fs="ntfs" number="1" serial="3fca2cb8f92cb8e6" size="136306688" type="7" />
    </partitions>
    <oses>
        <id3056036235 boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="1709083925" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="%n%l %l(%ll%l)" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" system_root_identifier="0000000000000000000000000000000006000000000000004800000000000000007e000000000000000000000000000000000000010000004cf9307400000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000\Windows" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="1">
            <partitions>
                <id1709083925 active="1" />
            </partitions>
        </id3056036235>
        <id########## boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="##########" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="Vista Manual" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="0">
            <partitions>
                <id########## active="1" />
            </partitions>
        </id##########>

    </oses>
    <checkfiles />
    <bootmgr default_os="3056036235" disks_order_feature="1" />
</bootwiz>

The next step is to change the OS ID value. Make sure to use a unique OS ID number. This number is often 9 or 10 digits long, though it can be shorter. I usually just copy an existing ID and change the last several numbers. Make sure to enter the new ID in both places:

<id3056036246 boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="##########" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="Vista Manual" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="0">
    <partitions>
        <id########## active="1" />
    </partitions>
</id3056036246>

Now, the booting partition needs to be set. The booting partition is always the partition that contains the booting files for the Vista installation (even if it's a Logical partition). In this example, the undetected Vista partition is the third Primary partition on the booting drive, which has an ID value of 2457113254. Scroll horizontally to see the change.

<id3056036246 boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="2457113254" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="Vista Manual" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="0">
    <partitions>
        <id########## active="1" />
    </partitions>
</id3056036246>

The next step is to set the ID value for the partition that should be Active. In the case of Vista installations to Primary partitions, this should be the same as the booting partition. In the case of Vista being on a Logical partition, any Primary partition can be set as Active.

<id3056036246 boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="2457113254" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="Vista Manual" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="0">
    <partitions>
        <id2457113254 active="1" />
    </partitions>
</id3056036246>

Finally, edit the name_template value. This will be the title as displayed in the OSS menu. In this example, I've changed the name to Vista Ultimate. Scroll horizontally to see the change.

<id3056036246 boot_as_ms71="0" boot_as_os2="0" boot_cd_entry="0" boot_partition="2457113254" bootname="bootsect.sys" icon="icon_sys_vista" language="english" lba="1" name_template="Vista Ultimate" nthide="0" os_type="ntvista" uninstall_info="1" use_manual_disks_order="0" write_boot="0">
    <partitions>
        <id2457113254 active="1" />
    </partitions>
</id3056036246>

After you're finished, double-check the changes to make sure they're correct. If OSS detects something wrong it will usually do one of two things: a) remove the invalid entry; 2) recreate the BOOTWIZ.OSS file.

Save the BOOTWIZ.OSS file. If you have OSS in Windows, you can start the program and check if the new OS entry is present. Otherwise, reboot to the OSS menu.

Hopefully, if the changes are done correctly, your Vista installation will boot properly.

If you run into problems or need to clarify something before making any changes, please post your questions in the Acronis Disk Director Support Forum.
Additional Important Information

Here is some more information to help you avoid problems:

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